Pacing

A story should have different paces to its telling and showing (Anae 2017). I feel that when there is action, it should be, to a certain extent, fast paced, giving the reader a sense of urgency to pull them into the action. It would also give the writer a moment to go with the flow, to get caught up in the story and be able to express what they wish to show the reader with a clearer vision. After some fast paced action, I think the story should take on a slower pace, because the fast pace scenes can invariably create new normal’s for the characters.

After taking the reader on a fast paced ride, reducing the post wall action scene in my story, to the pre shadow scene, would likely ensure a certain amount of deflation in the mind of the reader, and could possibly loose them at that point.

King (2000) notes that, ‘there appears to be an unspoken belief in publishing circles that the most commercially successful stories and novels are fast-paced’ (p. 220), but goes onto state that this belief is, ‘largely bullshit’ (p. 221). Burroway (2007) notes that in literature, ‘when people talk, they convey much more than information in their dialogue’ (p. 92). Dialogue also works for the author, ‘to reveal themselves, advance the plot, fill in the past, control the pace, establish the tone, foreshadow the future and establish the mood’ (Burroway 2007, p. 92) Brown says that, ‘a successful writing for children dialogue will be, by and large, fast paced with at least some humour’ (2007). The Milly story has become fast paced in its show and tell and attempts to make the reader laugh and cry, as they also experience the children’s journey.
Anae, DN 2017, The fundamentals of writing: fiction, PowerPoint presentation, CF08: Master of letters, CQUniversity e-Units, http://moodle.cqu.edu.au

Brown, A 2007, ‘Writing for children’, in S Earnshaw (ed.), The handbook of creative writing, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.

Burroway, J 2007, Imaginative writing: elements of craft, Pearson, Florida.

King, S 2000, On writing: a memoir of the craft , Simon & Schuster, New York.

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